A 2015 OHRC Report Highlights Thought-provoking Statistics About Ontarians with Mental Health and Addiction Disabilities

A 2015 OHRC Report Highlights Thought-provoking Statistics About Ontarians with Mental Health and Addiction Disabilities

The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC), with support from the Canadian Human Rights Commission, has developed a statistical report on mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario.

The report is called By the numbers, and it highlights some interesting statistics on mental health and addiction disabilities in workers across Ontario. Data from a 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability was used, which included participants fifteen years of age, and up.

The statistics suggest that, compared to people with other types of disabilities, and people without disabilities, those suffering from mental health and addiction disabilities had lower levels of education, lower income, and ultimately lower workforce participation.

There may be a possibility that those suffering with a mental health or addiction disability, the disability being potentially more complex in nature when compared to other types of disabilities, could have a more difficult time getting the help and support they need.

Powerful Statistics:

  • Of all Ontarians who reported having a disability (15.4%), 4.8% reported having a mental health or addiction disability – that’s roughly 1 in 3. Approximately Twenty percent of this group are low-income vs. Ten percent for those reporting no disabilities.
  • The unemployment rate, in 2011, of Ontarians between the ages of 15 and 64 with a mental health or addiction disability, was 3 times higher than it was for Ontarians without disabilities.
  • A startling number of people with disabilities reported being discriminated against at work, regardless of their disability. Approximately 67% of those who reported having a mental health or addiction disability, said they felt disadvantaged at work due to their condition.

What Employers Should Know:

According to a policy from the Ontario Human Rights Commission on preventing discrimination based on mental health, disabilities, and addictions, in order to best prepare for an accommodation, employers should:

  • Work with an expert accommodation provider or Occupational Therapist on an ongoing basis to manage the accommodation process.
  • Accept requests for accommodation in good faith, and take an active role in exploring traditional, and alternative solutions.
  • Conduct open discussions about possible accommodation solutions to gain more insight.
  • Be aware that an accommodation may be necessary even in cases where the employee has not made a formal request.
  • Implement accommodations in a timely manner.
  • Be discreet, respectful, and maintain trust and confidentiality.

How Gowan Consulting Can Help:

  • Provide support for policy and procedures development.
  • Train managers and employees on the duty to accommodate.
  • Provide objective Occupational Therapy assessments for accommodation requests.

If you would like to learn more about workplace accommodations, please check out our services for Providing Early Intervention and Return to Work planning or check out our blog on Workplace Accommodation and Disabilities.

Also, registration is now open for our fall workshops, so book today to take advantage of our early-bird pricing!

We also have webinars on accommodation, mental healthreturn to work and several other topics if self-learning is more your thing!

Want to know how we can assist you personally in the workplace? Contact Us!

works cited:

Ontario Human Rights Commission, Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health, disabilities, and addictions, http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/policy-preventing-discrimination-based-mental-health-disabilities-and-addictions/13-duty-accommodate

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/en/numbers-statistical-profile-people-mental-health-and-addiction-disabilities-ontario

http://www.ohrc.on.ca/sites/default/files/By%20the%20numbers_Statistical%20profile%20of%20people%20with%20mental%20health%20and%20addiction%20disabilities%20in%20Ontario_accessible_5.pdf

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